Business News | AM 1430 WCMY | The Voice of Starved Rock Country
  • Jack Taylor/Getty Images(LONDON) -- British Airways CEO Alex Cruz said he was "profusely sorry" for Saturday's worldwide computer outage that stranded thousands of passengers.In an interview that aired on the BBC, Cruz said that the airline will be back to operating 95 percent of its flights from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports on Monday.He added that a power surge was to blame for the outage and reiterated that there is no evidence of any kind of cyber attack.An investigation is underway to learn why backup systems didn't kick in, Cruz said.A British Airways spokesperson told ABC News on Monday, "The power supply issue was at one of our U.K. data centers local to the Heathrow area."British Airways, which is part of the broader International Airlines Group, canceled all flights from Heathrow and Gatwick on Saturday after the company suffered a colossal IT failure.British Airways canceled another 27 flights and had 117 more delayed on Monday. Its sister airlines in Spain -- Iberia and Air Nostrum -- canceled more than 320 flights on Monday, according to data from flight tracker FlightAware.com.The airline is urging customers to check that their flight is operating before heading to the airport.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Heather Cabot, a journalist and co-author of the new book Geek Girl Rising: Inside the Sisterhood Shaking Up Tech, appeared live on ABC News' Good Morning America Monday to share some of the best new gadgets for girls to play with that are also meant to keep their brains active all summer long.In Geek Girl Rising, Cabot interviews female leaders in Silicon Valley and beyond, who are shaking up the nation's tech scene and destabilizing the misconception that women don't belong in the science and technology field."I'm a mom to kids who love technology and my co-author and I were really concerned about the fact that a small number of women are really going into computer science and engineering and of course you can't avoid the headlines today about the sexism in Silicon Valley," Cabot said Monday on Good Morning America. "So what we decided to do is to actually find the stories of the women who are succeeding in tech -- to find out how they did it, and to get their advice for our daughters."Cabot also examines how societal pressures, from even an extremely young age, can veer girls away from a career in science and technology fields.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Travel can be expensive, but Farecompare CEO Rick Seaney sat down with ABC News to give his tips on how to avoid the most costly fees during your summer trips.Here's what he had to say:Good news! As of last month, Spirit passengers who wait to pay their carry-on fee at the gate get a break. What once cost $100 is now a mere $65. While you’re digesting that, let’s look at other fees and ways to avoid them. Change feesThese are the worst and usually most expensive fees. It can cost up to $200 on large airlines to make any changes to a ticket for a domestic flight, and $400 (or more) for international itineraries. We are talking about the usual non-refundable tickets; refundable airfare is very expensive. What to do?Be certain of your dates: This is especially important when planning a trip with friends or family. Make sure everyone is in agreement about the itinerary before you book the flights.Fly the no-fee airline: Southwest is the only airline that does not charge a change fee.Change your mind quickly: The U.S. Department of Transportation rule says shoppers can change (or cancel) tickets within 24 hours of purchasing them with no penalty.Throw yourself on the mercy of the airline: A few legacy carriers still allow cancellations in extreme situations (such as a death in the family) but not all airlines do. If you think you have a special case, by all means, call the airline and explain the situation. You might get lucky, you might not.Food and drink feesDelta and American now offer meals in economy on some routes. Others offer a little something free like soft drinks and the inevitable tiny package of peanuts or pretzels, but you won’t get even that on Spirit, Frontier or other ultra-discount carriers. So don’t forget your credit card!A better idea: Buy something at the airport (fairly expensive but at least you won’t go hungry), or even better, bring some food from home. You won’t look odd because everyone does it, and super-savvy travelers bring empty plastic bottles through security to replenish at one of those water-filling stations found in many airports.Baggage feesWhich airline still allows you to check a big bag for free? Only Southwest. As for smaller carry-on bags, they’re free on most airlines with the exception of Allegiant, Frontier and Spirit. Another exception is flying basic economy on American and United (those customers cannot bring carry-ons onto a plane but must check them for a fee). What to do?Check size allowances: Some airlines, including Spirit, allow travelers to take a very small bag if placed under a seat and this could work for a weekend trip.Check the difference in bag fees: Airlines that charge for all bags sometimes charge more for carry-ons (probably so fewer passengers will bring bags on the aircraft which can slow boarding and create delays). A checked bag can be cheaper.Pay early: Some airlines offer the cheapest bag fee during booking; if you wait to pay until check-in or at the airport, the price may zoom, especially on those ultra-cheap airlines.Use a carry-on no matter what it costs: If you are allowed to bring a regular-size carry-on aboard the plane, do it even if you have to pay, for this reason: The bag that travels by your side is the bag that cannot get lost.Better seat feesMore and more economy travelers are making a rude discovery. After they book their flights, they check their seats only to learn they have a terrible one (in the back or a middle seat) or they have no seat whatsoever and are told it will be assigned later. What to do?You could pay for early seat selection (sometimes this is only a few dollars but it can be a lot more), but here’s a better idea.First, sign up for your airline’s miles program. It costs nothing and it may give you a slight edge in the airline game of "who gets assigned the better seat."Then, be vigilant; return to your reservation every few days or so to see if a
    Read more...
  • ABC News(DUBLIN, Calif.) -- Terrifying video captures the moment a young boy flew off of a brand new waterslide at a water park in California.The incident took place on Saturday, which was the opening day of the new park called The Wave at Emerald Glen Park, which is owned by the city of Dublin, California.The boy was reportedly hospitalized, but released the same day with minor injuries. His family declined ABC News' request for comment."Obviously that's not what you want to have happen on your first day," Linda Smith, the assistant city manager for the City of Dublin told ABC station KGO-TV in San Francisco. "But we want everyone who comes to this park to have a safe and fun experience and that's our primary goal."Smith told KGO-TV that she witnessed the boy fall off the slide and onto the concrete, describing his response as, "he seemed to be shook, but seemed to be OK." Smith adds that he was able to get up and walk to the first aid room to get checked out.Smith said they are closing down three of the park's waterslides pending further inspection, but they do not have "an exact reason" for what made the boy fly off the slide."We take safety very seriously and we are going to make sure that before we re-open those slides that they are safe for use," Smith said."Our thoughts are with the family that had this experience," she added. "We are going to do everything we can to make sure that doesn’t happen again."The incident comes nearly a year after the 10-year-old son of a Kansas state lawmaker was killed after a horrific accident at a water slide in Kansas City, Kansas, sparking a national conversation about waterslide safety.
    Read more...
  • British Airways(LONDON) -- British Airways is resuming departures from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports on Sunday, following the cancellation of flights on Saturday due to a worldwide computer outage that struck at the start of a busy holiday weekend.
    Read more...
  • Taylor Hill/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Bonnie Kalanick, the mother of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, has died in a boating accident near Fresno, California, according to a statement from the ride-sharing company.
    Read more...