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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Federal Communications Commission is warning consumers about a new scam that is hooking consumers with just one word: Yes.According to the FCC, the scam begins as soon as a person answers the phone. A recorded voice or an actual person asks: "Can you hear me?" And the consumer responds, "Yes.""The caller then records the consumer's 'Yes' response and thus obtains a voice signature. This signature can later be used by the scammers to pretend to be the consumer and authorize fraudulent charges via telephone," an FCC news release said."According to complaints the FCC has received and public news reports, the fraudulent callers impersonate representatives from organizations that provide a service and may be familiar to the person receiving the call, such as a mortgage lender or utility, to establish a legitimate reason for trying to reach the consumer," the news release said.Theresa Thomas said Monday that she'd received a similar phone call about a month ago."The person on the other line sounded like a young woman. She was giggling and she said: 'Oh, I didn't expect you to pick up! Can you hear me?'" Thomas said. "Which, of course, if someone asks if you can hear them, I said the logical thing and I said 'Yes.' And she proceeded to talk."Thomas said she soon realized that the caller was a recording, hung up the call and then blocked the phone number. The next day, she learned of the scam on social media.The FCC advised consumers to immediately hang up if they receive this type of call. It also said that if consumers had responded "Yes" to a similar call in the past, they should keep an eye on all financial statements for any unauthorized charges.Thomas said that she'd been checking her credit-card and bank accounts and had reported the incident to the Better Business Bureau."I have not seen anything negative happen from that but it's just good to be aware," Thomas said.The FCC also shared the following tips:
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed lower Monday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average posted yet another losing session.The Dow Jones sunk 45.74 (-0.22 percent) to finish at 20,550.98 for its eighth day of losses.The Nasdaq gained 11.64 (+0.20 percent) to close at 5,840.37, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,341.59, down 2.39 (-0.10 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were under $48 a barrel; about 0.4 percent lower.President Trump: Investors are still weighing President Trump's Friday health care defeat after Republicans withdrew the bill due to lack of support from within the party and from Democrats. Now, investors are waiting to learn more about the president's plans for tax reform and regulation cuts. Winners and Losers: Snapchat parent Snap Inc. soared nearly 5 percent after it was handed several "buy" ratings from analysts.Shares in Foamix Pharmaceuticals tumbled about 42 percent on news it failed to reach goals in a Phase 3 study for its acne drug.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — Real estate that belonged to President Trump before he started putting his name on things has sold at a nifty profit. Long before Trump Tower on 5th Avenue, there was 8515 Wareham Place. Until he was four years old, President Trump grew up in a five-bedroom Tudor-style home in the Jamaica Estates section of Queens. Isaac Kestenberg lived in that house for eight years. “Tourists from Europe — from everywhere come to take a picture,” he said.Kestenberg sold the home in December for $1.4 million and the house just sold again at auction for more than $2.1 million dollars. The auction house, Paramount Realty USA, said the sale price is more than double the average list price for similar homes in the neigborhood.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WALTHAM, Mass.) -- A scientist and inventor affiliated with Brandeis University has solved an age-old problem: wine bottles that drip after you pour them. Wine, like any liquid, loves the slippery surface of glass, which leads to the inevitable drip down the side after you pour a glass.Usually a plug-in nozzle or a towel wrapped around a bottle was needed to catch that stray swish -- but thanks to scientist Daniel Perlman, those are no longer needed.Perlman studied the flow of liquid on bottles for three years, finally realizing that etching a groove right under the wine bottle's lip does the trick.The tiny notch is just enough to catch the drip, sparing your linens.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockThere are a lot of financial benefits to being married. But that's not always the case at tax time.
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  • United Airlines(DENVER) — United Airlines responded to criticism it received on Sunday after it barred two teenage girls from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings.The incident sent several social media users into an angry uproar, with some calling the policy sexist and discriminatory against women.
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