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  • iStock/Thinkstock(TAMPA, Fla.) -- Dozens were hospitalized amid blazing temperatures during an electronic dance music festival in Florida, despite efforts by organizers to keep people cool and hydrated.Tampa Fire Rescue Department Public Information Officer Jason Penny told ABC News that a total of 32 people were transported to hospitals on Saturday from the 2017 Sunset Music Festival at the Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, nearly 10 more people than last year.Another 65 patients were treated on site Saturday, Penny said. Those who ended up at the hospital were treated for non-life-threatening issues, including dehydration and intoxication, he added.Authorities are awaiting final numbers of those hospitalized on Sunday.This year, organizers offered free water bottles and set up water stations, canopies and a cooling area at the two-day event, where more than 50,000 people were expected to attend. The additions were made after two people died last year from apparent overdoses while dozens of others were hospitalized, according to according to ABC affiliate WFTS-TV in Tampa.Temperatures in Tampa reached a high of 91 degrees Fahrenheit over Memorial Day weekend, a few degrees hotter than last year, according to forecasters.In addition to hospitalizations, there were 30 felony arrests and 16 misdemeanor arrests at the festival, Tampa Police Department Public Information Officer Stephen Hegarty told ABC News.That’s 13 more arrests than last year, WFTS-TV reported.There were also 47 ejections from the festival and five citations for possession of marijuana.But overall, there were no major criminal incidents on either day of the festival, Hegarty said.The lineup for this year’s Sunset Music Festival included electronic musical trios Major Lazer and Above & Beyond."Obviously this is a rave scene, but not everybody does drugs," Rashad Arjomand, who attended the festival, told WFTS-TV. "Some of us like to come out here and party."Festival organizers did not immediately return ABC News' request for comment.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Scientists are issuing a new warning about ticks, saying this year could mark a big jump in their population.In fact, it could be one of the worst years yet. The news comes as we approach summer and more Americans head outdoors.So why is this year in particular projected to be bad? Watch the ABC News report below to find out:
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Could a vaccine prevent breast cancer?HeritX, a global research organization focused solely on preventing inherited cancers, says about 10 to 20 percent of cancer patients have inherited cancer and its using the BRCA gene as a key. The gene is hereditary and results in an 86 percent chance of getting breast cancer. It also puts carriers at risk for ovarian cancer.The group says they're not working on a cure but prevention, and it's hoping to create a vaccine in the next 10 years to prevent BRCA-positive breast cancer from ever occurring.For more on the potential vaccine, watch the report below from ABC News' Linsey Davis:
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  • iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical ContributorIt seems more young adults are dialing back on dairy -- and that may not be a good thing.The National Osteoporosis Society recently looked at nearly 300 patients under the age of 25 and found that 20 percent of them had been cutting back or completely eliminating dairy from their diet, in part because of advice they had read from bloggers. But if you’re going to eliminate milk and other dairy products from your diet, it’s important to supplement your diet with other calcium-rich foods. We still have a lot to learn about nutritional science but after getting a degree in nutrition, I’ve come to the opinion that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to eating, nutrition and the links to health and disease. Also, we can’t look at diet, health or disease in a vacuum. Dairy-free may be good for one thing but bad for another.
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  • WBMA(NEW YORK) -- A set of quadruplets graduated high school in Alabama, making their mother's dream for them come true.Taylor, Tanner, Anniston and Thompson Payne -- known locally as the "Payne Quads" -- are actually the second set of quadruplets to graduate in Chilton County, Alabama. But they are the first in the county to graduate together, according to the school district.The Payne Quads made news on Oct. 13, 1998 when they became the first set of quadruplets delivered at Brookwood Women's Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama.Their mother, Christie Payne, said doctors told her the chances that she would carry all four babies to term were small. She prepared herself for the worst."First they saw one and then they saw two, then we started to get excited," Christie Payne told ABC-affiliate WBMA. "And then they saw three. Then, we became a little nervous. And by the time we saw the fourth one, we were really nervous."Christie Payne and her husband Brian Payne said they rejoiced after all four babies were born and have celebrated their children's lives fully. "Every single year, we each got our own cake," Tanner Payne told WBMA. "We've never done just a single birthday."As high school graduation day approached, their father started to get nostalgic."I've always told them [on] graduation night, your bags are going to be on the carport," Brian Payne said. "But the closer I get, the more I worry.""I just want them to know how much we love them, how hard we tried to get them here, and what miracles they really are," Christie Payne said. "And that they mean the world to us."The Isabella High School graduation ceremony took place on Thursday. Anniston and Thompson are going to college, while Tanner and Taylor plan to start working.
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  • Ashley Larson(NICEVILLE, Florida) -- Ashley Larson was having such a hard time coping with her mother's cancer diagnosis that she stopped doing one of the things she loves most: photography."I've been shooting since I was a kid," Larson, 27, told ABC News. "But when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer, I was having a hard time coping with it. I stopped taking photography clients. My heart just wasn't in it anymore."Larson's mom, Diane Willoughby, was diagnosed with breast cancer last May.Willoughby, 57, who has four children including Larson, told ABC News that she "didn't really know what to think" after the diagnosis."At first, everybody around me was reacting," she said, adding that even the technician at the doctor's office was "in tears." "I had to comfort her. ... It was kind of like that throughout the whole thing."Willoughby, who lives in Niceville, Florida, endured six rounds of intense chemotherapy over four months and underwent a double mastectomy.During Willoughby's treatment, Larson got an idea that she thought might help her deal with her mother's illness. She said she decided to photograph her own 3-year-old daughter, Scout, dressed up as "strong, fierce women" such as Adele, Frida Kahlo, Carrie Fisher, Betty White and Ellen DeGeneres."I really wanted for me and Scout both to be reminded how strong women are," Larson said.Then when Willoughby was declared cancer-free earlier this month, Larson wanted to mark the occasion with her another photo shoot. Willoughby said she was immediately on board."I thought it was a wonderful creative way to work through what she was having to do deal with," the mother said of her photographer daughter. "It seemed to be affecting everyone more than it did me."The 10-minute photo shoot, held earlier this month, featured Scout and Willoughby wearing almost-matching T-shirts. Willoughby's read, "I am cancer free. Let's party!" while Scout's declared, "Nonnie is cancer free."Willoughby said her daughter got wonderful photos in no time."Ashley is an amazing photographer," Willoughby said. "It took her a matter of seconds."And for Larson, the photos were cathartic."I was so happy that my mom let me do it because she does not like the spotlight. She’s so selfless," she said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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